Make a MONSTER!

Make a Monster

 

Who doesn’t like a proper monster now and then?  Especially one that you can hug or pose or throw at people.

But a good monster needs good writing to bring it to life.  With that in mind, my sister, the toy maker and horror fanatic, is holding a monster-themed short story competition, the prize for which is a custom-designed stuffed/plush/doll of your very own featured monster.

Sound awesome?  Of course it does.  Click here for details!

M-M-M-MONSTER!

 

Bene scribete.

Mythological Limerick Round-Up

Thanks to all who participated in this last week’s poetry…thing!  Hopefully it was mildly entertaining.

There were some fun contributions.  If I have to pick a winner (which, according to myself, I do), it is this one, by Linda Colman:

 

Unicorn

A unicorn born to a mare
Sought solace in a punnett square:
“My horn though impressive
Is clearly recessive –
Not wrought for Celebrity’s glare.”

 

Nice use of catalectic amphibrachic paired with the acatalexis of the short lines!  And an extra point for using an open en dash.  (>^-‘)>  I see you’re on Google+, so I’ll hit you up there for the prize.

 

In other news, I’ve finally finished a presentable draft of The Book’s ninth chapter.  Before moving on to the next one, I think I’ll take a brief (…optimistically) intermission to work on a short story idea that’s been bouncing around in my head for a while, pestering me to get written.

 

Bene scribete.

Prodding for Limericks

Just a quick reminder – a couple days left to submit a limerick for some rhyme-y meter-y fun (and a chance at a $10 Amazon credit), if anyone else is so inclined!

Writin' Fish

As the norm of popular poetry these days shifts strongly in the direction of free-verse, I’ve been missing some good ol’ rhyme and meter.

So, this week I thought I would invite everyone to join me in having some fun with theme and structure.  I figured we could start with a round of limericks – they’re easy and entertaining, right?  If you need a refresher (or just like nit-picky specifications), a limerick is a five-line poem, often comical in nature, with an A/A/B/B/A rhyme scheme, and typically a 3/3/2/2/3-foot meter – every foot usually amphibrachic (short-STRESS-short), but sometimes anapestic (short-short-STRESS).

The theme for these limericks will be…mythological creatures.  Well-known or obscure, from any culture.

If you’d like to participate, just post your poem in the comments!  As a bit of incentive, I’ll give the author of the best one (in my very subjective opinion) a $10 USD Amazon credit (as regionally appropriate).

 

 

Once more, simplified –…

View original post 69 more words

Calling All Poets

As the norm of popular poetry these days shifts strongly in the direction of free-verse, I’ve been missing some good ol’ rhyme and meter.

So, this week I thought I would invite everyone to join me in having some fun with theme and structure.  I figured we could start with a round of limericks – they’re easy and entertaining, right?  If you need a refresher (or just like nit-picky specifications), a limerick is a five-line poem, often comical in nature, with an A/A/B/B/A rhyme scheme, and typically a 3/3/2/2/3-foot meter – every foot usually amphibrachic (short-STRESS-short), but sometimes anapestic (short-short-STRESS).

The theme for these limericks will be…mythological creatures.  Well-known or obscure, from any culture.

If you’d like to participate, just post your poem in the comments!  As a bit of incentive, I’ll give the author of the best one (in my very subjective opinion) a $10 USD Amazon credit (as regionally appropriate).

 

$10 Amazon Credit

Buy a book, or…anything else.

 

Once more, simplified – write a limerick about a mythological creature, post it in the comments, and next week (November 3, 2012) the ‘winning’ contribution will get some Amazon money.

To start things off, I’ll leave you with a not-particularly-humorous example of my own:

A dragon lay siege to a castle
And said to himself, “What a hassle
To plunder unaided
And end up half-sated;
I ought to get myself a vassal.”

 

Bene scribete.